Swimwear brand’s ‘shocking’ bikini stunt at Miami Swim Week slammed

A popular swimwear brand has been accused of cultural appropriation after dressing one of its models in a Native American headdress during Miami Swim Week.

Videos filmed during the annual fashion event’s Amarotto Swimwear show left many shocked after clips showed a model wearing a Native American war bonnet.

The feathered headdress is traditionally worn by male leaders of American Plains Indian nations who have earned a place of great respect in their tribe.

They were originally sometimes worn in battle, but are now used primarily for ceremonial occasions and are a well-known symbol of strength and courage for the indigenous peoples of North America.

Using the traditional culture of an ethnic minority as an item of clothing or to promote a brand and ultimately profit from it is widely considered “offensive”.

Swimwear brand criticized for bikini stunt

It’s for this reason that an image of a model wearing a leopard-print one-piece swimsuit alongside Native American headdress has sparked anger online, with many calling it “horrifying.”

“Absolutely appalling and disrespectful. Please, please, PLEASE stop doing this. I understand that our culture is beautiful but it is OUR culture. And it should be treated with respect. Despite the ‘intentions’ it is wrong, everyone knows it. So stop doing this,” one person wrote on Instagram.

“This is completely inappropriate to deal with indigenous culture,” said another.

As one said: “I’m shocked this was approved. The designer should be ashamed of herself for being so uncreative and ignorant about Tribal Regalia. A war bonnet is NOT meant for the runway.

News.com.au has contacted Amarotto Swimwear for comment.

Others have apologized to the brand, which describes its pieces as “handmade by artists in Colombia”, adding that there is “absolutely no excuse” for the stunt.

“Cultural appropriation is a BIG NO in 2024,” one raged.

“This is damn offensive. If it’s not your culture, don’t pretend it is,” another added.

As one of them revealed, they would boycott the swimwear brand, declaring they would “never” support it.

“Doing something like this in 2024 is frankly embarrassing,” one added.

“2005 announced that they want their cultural appropriation (and tackiness) back,” reflects another.

Meanwhile one seethed, writing: “He is energizing the colonizers.”

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